Egyptian Vulture from the Eastern Rhodopes settled in Northern Bulgaria

04.06.2013
B28 on the feeding site in its breeding territory in northern Bulgaria (2013)

We recently published news about a bird with a green ring on the left leg, which formed a pair in Northern Bulgaria. At this stage we couldn’t say anything but the bird is from generation 2008 because we were not able to decipher the code of the ring. Thanks to the photographic skills and diligence of one of our most experienced associates - Dimitar Nedelchev, who guarded and fed the pair with great care, we were able to gain a detailed picture of the bird. It turned out that this vulture is our old acquaintance bearing ring code B28. It all started in the beginning of June five years ago. The crack of a brown egg shell and the first breath mark the beginning of a new life. In the heart of the Eastern Rhodopes, in a cozy alcove rock, covered with soft, warm wool a small Egyptian Vulture was born. Two months later BSPB team put colored metal rings on the two, wishing them strength and success. One of the rings has the number B28. In September that year, the young and inexperienced Egyptian Vulture left his homeland and departed on his first big adventure - migration. At this point we lose track of her, but only to meet again three years later. In May 2011 we received a signal about an Egyptian Vulture in poor condition. It turned out to be precisely B28. Locals from the village Listets (Silistra District) found the vulture with symptoms of severe food poisoning. Due to the rapid and adequate intervention of the Green Balkans Wildlife rehabilitation and breeding centre the condition of the vulture has been stabilized. After a two-month recovery period B28 flew again over native Eastern Rhodopes. Only a few days later we were watching her feeding with other Egyptian and Griffon Vultures, which give us stronger hopes for her survival. And now 2 years later she had not just survived, but also successfully formed a pair 230 km away from her first nest. Her partner is a widowed male, who lost his mate in unclear circumstances last year. The newly formed pair began hatching, but unfortunately the hatching failed. It is normal for still inexperienced birds, such as B28, who breed for the first time.
The fact that individuals from the main population in the Eastern Rhodopes, where the number is relatively stable, tend to form pairs in Northern Bulgaria, where the number of the species continues to decline from year to year, brings new hope to our team.
We wish a long and happy life to the new pair!

B28 as a chick in the nest in Eastern Rhodopes (2008)
B28 as a chick in the nest in Eastern Rhodopes (2008)
B28 in the rehabilitation center of Green Balkans in Stara Zagora (2011)
B28 first aid by Dr. Haralanov
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Useful information
Where is B14?

Where is B14?

The breeding performance of the Egyptian Vulture population in Bulgaria is among the highest in Europe

The breeding performance of the Egyptian Vulture population in Bulgaria is among the highest in Europe